UN political science professor sheds light on Russian invasion and possible impacts

President Joe Biden didn’t mince words in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. This is a flagrant violation of international law and demands a strong response from the international community,” Biden said. The president issued a number of sanctions against Russian financial institutions and oligarchs. The University of Nebraska Omaha is watching Russia closely saying the Kremlin could be on the brink of war. that we’ve all been trying to avoid for a long time,” Neathery-Castro said. “What the United States has tried to explain is that this kind of thing could be a real ploy for (Russia) to make it seem like a defensive action as opposed to aggressive action.” She said the actions of the United States, along with its allies like Germany blocking a gas pipeline, send a strong message. “What you’ve seen are real efforts by the United States and its allies to give Russia every chance to save face, so that a diplomatic solution looks like the man’s thing. ‘State to do,’ Neathery-Castro said. “Russia has been uneasy at every turn, with the prospects, especially Ukraine, of moving into the western fold. What we have here is that the Biden administration is showing even his hand on intelligence information, saying we think Russia is going to attack imminently. They’re going to pass this off as a peacekeeping mission. What we’ve really seen is kind of , at every stage, what the administration told us could happen, has happened,” she said. Neathery-Castro said the United States was not signaling that it would send troops to Ukraine, but was ready to put in place more sanctions in the hope of pushing Vladimir Putin back down. She said the invasion may not stop at Ukraine’s borders. “It could potentially be a conflict, you know, that wasn’t contained regionally in some way,” Neathery-Castro said. “And I think that’s really the crucial part. I mean, we wouldn’t get the European allies to take such a tough stance if they didn’t really feel threatened by that. That’s not the kind of buildup that you would typically see as just a show of force (by Russia). That’s the kind of buildup that you would see, you know, a potential hot war,” Neathery-Castro said. She said that Russia’s actions are a challenge to NATO and a global threat,” Neathery-Castro said. But it could also cost lives, which is why serious step-by-step sanctions are the course of action for the allies,” Neathery-Castro said. Neathery Castro says Russia’s entry into Ukraine, an area it has declared independent, can be used as a ‘defense’ invasion, not an aggressive action, which is part of a disinformation campaign major.

President Joe Biden didn’t mince words in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“Who in the name of the Lord, Putin thinks, gives him the right to declare new so-called countries on territory that belonged to his neighbors? This is a flagrant violation of international law and demands a strong response from the international community,” Biden said.

The president issued a number of sanctions against Russian financial institutions and oligarchs.

Jody Neathery-Castro, an associate professor of political science at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, is watching Russia closely, saying the Kremlin could be on the brink of war.

“Sending some kind of essential supplies like blood, I’ve become a bit like that, maybe that’s it, maybe that’s really the conflict that we’ve all been trying to avoid for a long time,” Neathery said. -Castro. “What the United States has tried to explain is that this kind of thing could be a real ploy for (Russia) to make it seem like a defensive action as opposed to aggressive action.”

She said the actions taken by the United States, along with those of allies like Germany shutting down a gas pipeline, send a strong message.

“What you’ve seen are real efforts by the United States and its allies to give Russia every chance to save face, so that a diplomatic solution looks like the right thing to do. a statesman,” Neathery-Castro said.

“Russia has been uneasy at every turn, with the prospects of, especially Ukraine, moving into the western fold. What we have here is that the Biden administration even shows his hand on intelligence information saying we think Russia is going to attack imminently they’re going to pass this off as a peacekeeping mission what we’ve really seen is kind of , at every step, what the administration told us could happen, has happened,” she said.

Neathery-Castro said the United States was not signaling that it would send troops to Ukraine, but was ready to put in place more sanctions in the hope of pushing Vladimir Putin back down.

She said the invasion may not stop at Ukraine’s borders.

“It could potentially be a conflict, you know, that wasn’t contained regionally in some way,” Neathery-Castro said.

“And I think that’s really the crucial part. I mean, we wouldn’t get the European Allies to take such a tough stance if they didn’t really feel threatened by it. It’s not the kind of buildup you would typically see as just a show of (Russian) strength. That’s the kind of buildup you would see for, you know, a potential hot war,” Neathery-Castro said.

She said Russia’s actions are a challenge to NATO and a global threat.

“The most immediate thing Americans could see is already more of some instability in energy prices,” Neathery-Castro said.

But it could also cost lives, which is why serious step-by-step sanctions are the course of action for allies.

“The tools we have, kind of short of actual physical conflict, are things like economic sanctions,” Neathery-Castro said.

Neathery Castro said Russia’s move into Ukraine’s declared independent areas could be used as a “defense” invasion, not an aggressive move, which is part of a major disinformation campaign.

She adds that Russia’s cyberwarfare tactics will likely result in international cyberwarfare decrees or treaties.

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