Cyber war – TC Mech Wars http://tcmechwars.com/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:18:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tcmechwars.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/tc.png Cyber war – TC Mech Wars http://tcmechwars.com/ 32 32 Join AUC’s GAPP Tahrir Dialogue with Mark Turnage – Lectures – Al-Ahram Weekly https://tcmechwars.com/join-aucs-gapp-tahrir-dialogue-with-mark-turnage-lectures-al-ahram-weekly/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:46:09 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/join-aucs-gapp-tahrir-dialogue-with-mark-turnage-lectures-al-ahram-weekly/ Mark Turnage and Nabil Fahmy American University in CairoNew Cairo CampusWed 22, 7pm – 8pm (online event): Join this virtual session of the Gerhart Center Social Discussions titled “The Egyptian State’s Efforts in Family Development and the Importance of the Role of Youth” with Hala Azzam , director general of research and international agreements at […]]]>

Mark Turnage and Nabil Fahmy

American University in Cairo
New Cairo Campus
Wed 22, 7pm – 8pm (online event): Join this virtual session of the Gerhart Center Social Discussions titled “The Egyptian State’s Efforts in Family Development and the Importance of the Role of Youth” with Hala Azzam , director general of research and international agreements at the National Population Council. The lecture will discuss the history of overpopulation in Egypt and government efforts – this will include population characteristics and the national population strategy. Azzam will also highlight the importance of the role of young people and how the National Population Council includes young people in its strategy. The link is https://e.cglink.me/2kZ/r300070850
Moataz Al Alfi room and live broadcast
Thursday 23, 2-3:30 p.m.: The CUA Climate Change Initiative Launch features a lecture on the important leadership role of universities nationally and internationally in limiting the many dangers of climate change. Join AU Commission Chairperson Ahmed Dallal and UN High Level Climate Change Champion for Egypt, and International Monetary Fund Executive Director Mahmoud Mohei El Din (joining virtually) as they address the importance of using education and research to reduce our environmental footprint. The link is https://e.cglink.me/2kZ/r300070838

French Cultural Institute
Madrasset Al-Huquq Al Frinseya St, Mounira, Tel 02 2791 5800
Media library
Fri 17, 12 p.m.: Start the day with Salma Mohsein who will make you discover lots of stories during your favorite story time meeting followed by a creative workshop. Mohsein is a gifted teacher and reader.

Italian cultural institute
Mon 20, 6 p.m. (Online): Veronica Raimo, candidate for the Strega Prize for her novel Niente di Vero, meets readers in Egypt. The meeting will be held online in Italian at the IIC.

Tahrir Cultural Center (TCC)
Al-Sheikh Rihan Street, near Tahrir Square, Tahrir Campus, Tel. 02 2615 2694/01280009077
Sat 18, 1:30-10:00 p.m.: The inaugural AUC Venture Lab Summit is a day filled with expert knowledge, networking opportunities, and the latest in the entrepreneurship ecosystem. The event will feature valuable panels and inspiring one-on-one discussions, exclusive workshops and startup presentations. From valuable panel discussions and inspiring one-on-one discussions to exclusive workshops and V-Lab Demo Day featuring presentations from our Spring’22 cohort of innovative startups.
Please note that although tickets are free, pre-event registration is essential to guarantee campus access for this event. Attendees will receive event confirmations after registration. On the day of the event, be sure to bring your national ID card and a face mask to be able to participate in the event.
Oriental Room
Monday 20, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.: The School of Global Affairs and Public Policy (GAPP) will be hosting the GAPP Tahrir Dialogue (103) titled “Lessons Learned from Cyberwarfare Between Ukraine and Russia and Why Cyberwars of the Future Will Be Different from U.S”. Thought. former Egyptian Minister of Foreign Affairs. This will be a hybrid event, panelists and guests will only attend in person from the Oriental Hall of the AUC Tahrir campus. This measure is taken due to regulations regarding the maximum capacity of the COVID-19 room. If you wish to attend in person, register on [email protected] In addition, the event will take place in the form of an online webinar; to join the event virtually, please click on the link below: https://aucegypt.zoom.us/j/99020457799
An English-Arabic translation will be available for participants. (Please note that you must present proof that you are fully vaccinated when accessing the AUC Tahrir campus).

A version of this article appeared in the June 16, 2022 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly.

Short link:

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Germany is preparing for World War III with the passage of 100 billion euros “Special Fund of the Bundeswehr” https://tcmechwars.com/germany-is-preparing-for-world-war-iii-with-the-passage-of-100-billion-euros-special-fund-of-the-bundeswehr/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 03:03:51 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/germany-is-preparing-for-world-war-iii-with-the-passage-of-100-billion-euros-special-fund-of-the-bundeswehr/ The “Bundeswehr Special Fund” of more than €100 billion has now been approved by both houses of parliament, giving Germany’s rearmament campaign a massive boost. The World Socialist Website and the Sozialistische Gleichheitspartei (Socialist Equality Party, SGP) condemn this war offensive. We give voice to the massive opposition of working people to the madness of […]]]>

The “Bundeswehr Special Fund” of more than €100 billion has now been approved by both houses of parliament, giving Germany’s rearmament campaign a massive boost. The World Socialist Website and the Sozialistische Gleichheitspartei (Socialist Equality Party, SGP) condemn this war offensive. We give voice to the massive opposition of working people to the madness of war and provide a socialist perspective for the struggle against it.

With this decision, the ruling class set in motion the greatest spiral of rearmament since the fall of the Nazi regime. The political, historical and social implications are enormous. In the words of Chancellor Olaf Scholz (Social Democratic Party, SPD), Germany – already ranked fifth among the countries with the highest military budgets – will in future have “by far the largest conventional army in Europe”. .

After hospitals, schools and nurseries were on the brink of collapse and billions were cut from education and social services amid the still raging COVID-19 pandemic, 100 billion additional euros will be made available to the armed forces overnight. The war budget should thus increase each year to more than 2% of the gross domestic product.

The scale of the rearmament is gigantic. Reaching the so-called 2% target means defense spending will rise from just under €50 billion to over €70 billion this year alone. This represents an increase of more than 40%. To put the “special fund” into perspective, €100 billion is five times this year’s total federal budget for education and research.

The sum would be enough to support every family in Germany with €5,000 per child and at the same time pay €360,000 in compensation for pain and suffering to the relatives of all those who officially died from the coronavirus. Alternatively, the amount could be used over five years to double the number of nurses and pay their senior colleagues a bonus of €1,400. A single billion would be enough to install air filters against the coronavirus in all classrooms.

But instead, the money goes to the military. The Ministry of Defense plans, in addition to cyber capabilities and space systems, foresee 41 billion euros for the air force, 19 billion euros for the navy and 16 billion euros for the army , to be spent on nuclear bombers, warships and tanks. The war material is intended to enable the army to carry out “very extensive” and “very intensive” military operations again, according to the “Concept of the Bundeswehr” published in 2018.

Domestically, too, the rearmament offensive is a declaration of war against the people. By enshrining the special fund in the constitution and maintaining the so-called “debt brake”, the ruling class is creating the conditions to extract every penny of the war budget from the working class. At the same time, any criticism of rearmament must be made illegal.

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Live updates of the Russian-Ukrainian crisis | More bodies found in Mariupol as global food crisis looms https://tcmechwars.com/live-updates-of-the-russian-ukrainian-crisis-more-bodies-found-in-mariupol-as-global-food-crisis-looms/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 03:04:00 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/live-updates-of-the-russian-ukrainian-crisis-more-bodies-found-in-mariupol-as-global-food-crisis-looms/ Russia and Turkey on June 8 expressed support for a safe Black Sea corridor to allow Ukrainian grain exports, but Kyiv rejected the proposal, saying it was not credible. The European Union has accused Moscow of “weaponizing” food supplies to gain an advantage in the war. Meanwhile, Kyiv forces may have to withdraw from the […]]]>

Russia and Turkey on June 8 expressed support for a safe Black Sea corridor to allow Ukrainian grain exports, but Kyiv rejected the proposal, saying it was not credible. The European Union has accused Moscow of “weaponizing” food supplies to gain an advantage in the war.

Meanwhile, Kyiv forces may have to withdraw from the eastern city of Severodonetsk, a senior Ukrainian official acknowledged on Wednesday, as diplomatic efforts intensified to unblock grain stuck in Ukrainian ports.

The strategic city has become the center of the Russian offensive as it seeks to seize part of eastern Ukraine, having been pushed back from other parts of the country.

For more on the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian crisis, click here.

Kyiv

The brutal battle for Sievierodonetsk in Ukraine will determine the fate of Donbass, says Zelensky

The battle for the Ukrainian city of Sievierodonetsk is brutal and will determine the fate of the Donbass region, the country’s president has said, as Russian troops devastate the city in an assault aimed at controlling eastern Ukraine.

After failing to take control of the capital Kyiv, the Kremlin says it is now seeking to completely “liberate” Ukraine’s dissident Donbass where Russian-backed separatists broke control of the Ukrainian government in 2014. Reuters

Kyiv

Ukraine says Russia defeats Sievierodonetsk

An adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s office said Russian troops had changed tactics in the battle for Sievierodonetsk.

Oleksiy Arestovych said on Wednesday that Russian soldiers have withdrawn from the town and are now pounding it with artillery and airstrikes.

As a result, he says, the city center is deserted.- PA

NEW YORK

Russia feels too strong to talk, says Zelensky

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said Russia was unwilling to negotiate an end to the war because it still felt strong.

Mr Zelenskyy told US business leaders on Wednesday that Russia’s participation in the negotiations “is simply not possible now because Russia can still feel its power”.

Speaking via a video link via a translator, he added: “We have to weaken Russia and the world is supposed to.”- PA

BAKHMOUT

More bodies found in Mariupol as global food crisis looms

Workers removed dozens of bodies from destroyed buildings in an “endless death caravan” inside the devastated city of Mariupol, authorities said on Wednesday, as fears of a global food crisis grew. intensified in the face of Ukraine’s inability to export millions of tonnes of grain through its blocked ports. . – PA

LYSYCHANSK

‘Fierce battle’ in key eastern Ukrainian city largely under Moscow’s control: Zelensky

Russian forces now largely control the key city of Severodonetsk in eastern Ukraine amid fierce fighting, Kyiv said on Wednesday, as UN chief Antonio Guterres made it clear that the impact of the war on the world was worsening.

The strategic city has become the center of the Russian offensive as it seeks to seize part of eastern Ukraine, having been pushed back from other parts of the country. – AFP

THE UNITED NATIONS

Millions injured as war in Ukraine drives prices up

A UN report says the war in Ukraine is increasing the suffering of millions by raising food and energy prices, adding to the ills of a growing financial crisis, the impact of COVID-19 pandemic and climate change.

The UN Global Crisis Response Group report released Wednesday says the war ‘has exacerbated a global cost-of-living crisis not seen in at least a generation’ and undermines the UN’s goal of ending poverty. extreme poverty in the world by 2030. – PA

LILLE

Russia surprisingly poor at cyber warfare: European military leaders

Several European cyber defense military chiefs agreed on Wednesday that Russia had been much less effective than expected in using digital warfare capabilities in its offensive against Ukraine.

“Among cybersecurity experts, we were pretty sure there would be a cyber Pearl Harbor based on past experience of Russian behavior and capabilities,” said General Karol Molenda, head of the National Center for cybersecurity from Poland.

But Ukraine was prepared and “resisted attacks from Russia,” Molenda told a meeting of the International Cybersecurity Forum (ICF) held in Lille, northern France. . – AFP

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Mandiant and Interos offer advanced information in new partnership https://tcmechwars.com/mandiant-and-interos-offer-advanced-information-in-new-partnership/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 05:03:00 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/mandiant-and-interos-offer-advanced-information-in-new-partnership/ Mandiant and Interos have entered into a strategic partnership to provide advanced insights and analytics to help businesses defend against cyberattacks and other threats. The collaborative partnership aims to bring new insights to market based on insights gathered from Interos Resilience Lab and the company’s SaaS platform, as well as Mandiant’s frontline investigations and remediation. […]]]>

Mandiant and Interos have entered into a strategic partnership to provide advanced insights and analytics to help businesses defend against cyberattacks and other threats.

The collaborative partnership aims to bring new insights to market based on insights gathered from Interos Resilience Lab and the company’s SaaS platform, as well as Mandiant’s frontline investigations and remediation. regarding high-impact cyberattacks around the world.

Mandiant’s M-Trends 2022 report shows that global supply chains continue to be an attractive target for threat actors looking to leverage trusted business-to-business relationships, as attacking the supply chain offers the opportunity to move from a network of suppliers to several network customers simultaneously.

Additionally, supply chain compromise accounted for 17% of instructions investigated by Mandiant in 2021 when the initial infection vendor was identified, compared to less than 1% in 2020.

Additionally, new data from Interos’ Global Supply Chain Annual Report 2022 shows that companies have been hit by an average of three major supply chain disruptions in the past 12 months, representing a combined revenue loss of $182 million.

Of this figure, cyberattacks account for $37 million, and Interos adds that these figures exclude any impact from the war in Ukraine.

Additionally, 91% of executives said their companies had experienced supply chain disruptions from Tier 2 and Tier 3 suppliers in their extended supply chain.

“Interos is focused on helping organizations achieve operational resilience; continuously providing in-depth analysis of risk criticality and risk management,” said Marshall Heilman, Chief Technology Officer at Mandiant.

“With Interos, Mandiant will be able to proactively resolve issues with a company leading the way in ensuring organizations of all sizes understand the key attack vectors across the supply chain, the threat and threats of nation states.”

This partnership follows a recent alert from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) warning of an increase in malicious cyber activity targeting managed service providers (MSPs).

The advisory also recommended that MSPs understand and proactively manage their supply chain risks.

“The CISA warning is further evidence that existing supply chain risk management systems were not designed for today’s complex risk environment,” said Nishant Gupta, director of Interos technology.

“Our collaboration with Mandiant will provide multi-factor risk insights to help commercial and government organizations better protect targeted entities in their relationships with third parties to protect against disruption, ransomware and intellectual property theft.

“We are proud to partner with Mandiant to help executives uncover hidden business relationships and expose themselves to cyber vulnerabilities.”

The announcement also comes after CrowdStrike entered into a strategic partnership with Mandiant in April to help joint customers investigate, remediate and defend against increasingly sophisticated cybersecurity events plaguing organizations around the world. whole world.

CrowdStrike specializes in protecting endpoints, workloads, identity and data in the cloud.

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Musk’s SpaceX Starlink internet saves Ukraine from Russian propaganda: Zelensky https://tcmechwars.com/musks-spacex-starlink-internet-saves-ukraine-from-russian-propaganda-zelensky/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 12:18:00 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/musks-spacex-starlink-internet-saves-ukraine-from-russian-propaganda-zelensky/ SpaceX’s Starlink satellite system Is being credited with helping the Ukrainian people overcome Russian propaganda. As his country entered its 100th day since Russia’s invasion in February, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky praised SpaceX CEO Elon Musk’s satellite internet coverage, saying it was “very effective” in war-torn and otherwise disconnected regions of Ukraine where cell towers […]]]>

SpaceX’s Starlink satellite system Is being credited with helping the Ukrainian people overcome Russian propaganda.

As his country entered its 100th day since Russia’s invasion in February, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky praised SpaceX CEO Elon Musk’s satellite internet coverage, saying it was “very effective” in war-torn and otherwise disconnected regions of Ukraine where cell towers have been destroyed. .

“It helped us a lot, at many times related to the blockade of our cities, towns and related to the occupied territories,” Zelensky said. Cable.

TWITTER POLL INTENDED TO EXPOSE ELON MUSK AS “PHONY” FIRE RETURNS

Zelensky noted that sometimes his leadership “completely lost communication” with certain areas.

“To lose contact with these people is to completely lose control, to lose reality,” Zelensky added. “Believe me: people who came out of occupied cities, where there was no assistance such as Starlink, said that the Russians had told them that Ukraine no longer existed, and some people even started to believe it.”

Musk sent Starlink internet service to Ukraine after Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Mykhailo Federov tweeted at Musk on Feb. 26 asking for help restoring the country’s internet.

“I’m really grateful for Starlink’s support,” Zelensky said.

Ukrainian forces have used the Starlink system to facilitate their drone warfare, allowing Ukrainian troops to locate Russian targets even in very rural areas.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The Starlink system has also been the target of Russian cyber warfare, with Musk saying his space tech company has “resisted” such efforts.

“Starlink has so far resisted Russian cyber warfare jamming and hacking attempts, but they are stepping up their efforts,” Musk said. tweeted in May.

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FBI says it averted cyberattack on children’s hospital https://tcmechwars.com/fbi-says-it-averted-cyberattack-on-childrens-hospital/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 20:53:00 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/fbi-says-it-averted-cyberattack-on-childrens-hospital/ The agency alleges that the Iranian government sponsored the hackers. WASHINGTON — The FBI foiled a planned cyberattack on a children’s hospital in Boston that was to be carried out by Iranian government-sponsored hackers, FBI Director Christopher Wray said Wednesday. Wray told a cybersecurity conference at Boston College that his agents learned of the planned […]]]>

The agency alleges that the Iranian government sponsored the hackers.

WASHINGTON — The FBI foiled a planned cyberattack on a children’s hospital in Boston that was to be carried out by Iranian government-sponsored hackers, FBI Director Christopher Wray said Wednesday.

Wray told a cybersecurity conference at Boston College that his agents learned of the planned digital attack from an unspecified intelligence partner and obtained the information he needed from Boston Children’s Hospital. last summer to block what would have been “one of the most despicable cyberattacks I’ve seen”. ”

“And the quick actions of everyone involved, especially at the hospital, protected both the network and the sick children who depended on it,” Wray said.

The FBI chief told this anecdote in a larger discourse on cyber threats from Russia, China and Iran, and the need for partnerships between the US government and the private sector.

He said the office and Boston Children’s Hospital worked closely together after a hacktivist attacked the hospital’s computer network in 2014. Martin Gottesfeld launched a cyberattack on the hospital to protest medical care. a teenager at the center of a high-profile custody battle; Gottesfeld was later sentenced to 10 years in prison. The attack on the hospital and a treatment home cost the facilities tens of thousands of dollars and disrupted operations for days.

“Children’s and our Boston office already knew each other well — before Iran’s attack — and that made a difference,” Wray said.

He did not attribute any particular motive to the planned attack on the hospital, but he did note that Iran and other countries had hired cybermercenaries to carry out attacks on their behalf. In addition, the healthcare and public health sector is classified by the US government as one of 16 critical infrastructure sectors, and healthcare providers such as hospitals are considered ripe targets for the Pirates.

With respect to Russia, he said, the FBI is “rushing” to warn potential targets of preparatory actions hackers are taking for destructive attacks. In March, for example, the FBI warned that it was seeing increased hacker interest in energy companies since the start of Russia’s war on Ukraine.

Chinese hackers have stolen more corporate and personal data from the United States than all other countries combined, as part of a larger geopolitical goal of “lying, cheating, and hacking their way into the global naming of global sectors,” Wray said.

The speech came as the FBI continues to grapple with ransomware attacks by criminal gangs, an ongoing concern for US officials despite the absence of crippling intrusions in recent months.

Wray stressed the need for private companies to work with the FBI to thwart ransomware gangs and nation-state hackers.

“What these partnerships allow us to do is hit our adversaries at every turn – from victims’ networks to hackers’ own computers,” Wray said.

The FBI and other federal agencies work to assure hacking victims that it is in their best interest to report intrusions and cyber crimes. Many companies attacked by ransomware gangs often do not approach the FBI for various reasons.

Ohio Senator Rob Portman, the top Republican on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, released a report this year criticizing the FBI’s response to some ransomware victims. In two cases, the FBI “prioritized its investigative and prosecutorial efforts to disrupt the attackers’ operations over the victims’ need to protect data and mitigate harm,” the report said.

An anonymous Fortune 500 company told committee staff that the FBI offered no “helpful assistance” in responding to a ransomware attack.

Wray, however, cited the FBI’s ability to dispatch a technically trained agent to any victimized business within an hour – “and we use that a lot.”

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Will Russia launch another cyber attack on America? https://tcmechwars.com/will-russia-launch-another-cyber-attack-on-america/ Mon, 30 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/will-russia-launch-another-cyber-attack-on-america/ Political circles in Washington are currently debating how Vladimir Putin might react to a major contraction in the Russian economy and clear signs that Moscow is losing the war in Ukraine. Some posit that a cornered, furious, and near-defeated president might indeed react brutally, shifting the proxy confrontation from a new Cold War front to […]]]>

Political circles in Washington are currently debating how Vladimir Putin might react to a major contraction in the Russian economy and clear signs that Moscow is losing the war in Ukraine. Some posit that a cornered, furious, and near-defeated president might indeed react brutally, shifting the proxy confrontation from a new Cold War front to a cyber battleground, where Russia has a plus great advantage, and launching a massive cyberattack against the United States. . However, several key factors call this thesis into question.

Like Iran and North Korea, Russia is known to be responsible for some of the most aggressive large-scale cyberattacks. However, these cyber tactics have played a rather peripheral role, either supporting conventional warfare or through disinformation campaigns that serve to sow chaos and panic among targeted societies. For the first time, a known state-sponsored attack occurred in 2007 and lasted twenty-two days when the Russian military intelligence unit, the GRU, targeted commercial, government and name system servers. domain names (DNS) and Estonian online banking systems. . The attacks fell into the Denial of Service (DoS) and Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) categories which include methods such as ping flooding, spam distribution, botnets and phishing emails. In 2008, as part of a Hybrid War amid the occupation of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, Russia defaced Georgian state websites. In 2015, following the annexation of Crimea and the occupation of eastern Ukraine, a GRU proxy group named Sandworm attacked the Ukrainian. electrical network and deprived more than 200,000 people of electricity for six hours. In 2017, the NotPetya malware attack on Ukraine had an unprecedented impact on major Western companies in Europe and the United States such as Mondelez International and Maersk, and even hit back at Russian oil company Rosneft . It paralyzed thousands of networks. The global cost caused by the malware reached $10 billion, encapsulating the largest cyberattack in history. Additionally, just a month ago, Russia unsuccessfully attempted to attack Ukraine’s power grid with advanced malware classified as a windshield wiper. Abroad, a Russian hacking group called FancyBear meddled in the 2015 US presidential campaigns and the 2016 county-level federal elections. At this point, while Russian cyber tactics are common and manifold, they represent a secondary function in the hybrid warfare that Moscow is waging alongside disinformation campaigns and conventional military operations.

Nevertheless, cybersecurity experts speculate on a series of consequences in a worst-case cyber-scenario: Russia could attempt to attack American critical infrastructure, turn off lights, target the operation of ATMs and credit card systems. credit, attacking Amazon’s cloud, disrupting transportation and clean water supplies, and targeting pharmaceutical companies’ manufacturing facilities, power grids, and colonial pipelines. But will such a threat manifest itself?

Not only would a cyber attack on the United States contradict the historically peripheral nature of Russian cyber warfare, but Russia’s cyber capability would be insufficient for the task. In recent years, the West has vastly overestimated Russian military capabilities in conventional warfare. US intelligence agencies have predicted the 2022 war in Ukraine will be the most destructive the European continent has seen since the end of World War II, expecting the fall of Kyiv to come within days. However, the endless war still going on has exposed weaknesses in the Russian armed forces, its military arsenal and its strategic leadership. Russian officials, for their part, underestimated the strength of Ukrainian resistance and the united stance of the international community. Devoting just over 4% of the country’s GDP to the military, the Russian president is mobilizing domestic support for the military budget by articulating the external threat of NATO. In a relatively undigitized society like Russia, lobbying to spend more on e-budgeting would prove less effective. Given this, it seems possible that the West is also overestimating Russian cyber proficiency.

Moreover, Russia is unlikely to carry out a cyberattack against the United States due to fears of retaliation on multiple fronts. Russian society is already suffering the consequences of the war: an economic crisis and the psychological pressure of being considered a global pariah. In the event of a Russian cyber attack, the consequences of US cyber retaliation would first affect the public. Under current conditions, depriving people of water and electricity could spark public discontent on an unprecedented scale. Decades of increasingly authoritarian leadership have undoubtedly spawned public grievances hidden deep within society. At some point, this simmering discontent can escalate into indignation. Putin can ill afford to face further domestic turmoil now.

Current US cyber capabilities could also contribute to the fear of retaliation. Over the past few years, the United States has developed an impressive cyber infrastructure, restructured its governance system, and invested in cyber training and education. As Richard Clarke and Robert Knake point out in their book, The fifth domain, Following the Cold War’s strategy of deterrence and containment, the United States largely refrained from becoming involved in cyber counter activities. If America has long focused on a defensive cyber policy, today the US Cyber ​​Command favors offensive measures. For example, in 2019, the United States successfully targeted Iran’s intelligence service and missile launch system in response to an Iranian strike against a US drone and US tankers. Earlier in 2012, the Stuxnet computer Earthworm, designed in cooperation with Israel, successfully infiltrated nuclear facilities in Iran.

In addition to an offensive preference, a more consolidated governance system and set of regulations have advanced American cybersecurity. A clear division of roles and responsibilities between the Department of Homeland Security and US Cyber ​​Command and relevant leaders has improved the incident reporting and information sharing system. It has facilitated communication within federal agencies and between government, the private sector and the public. US private companies are now spending billions of dollars on cybersecurity, employee training and encrypted channels. The United States also plays a leading role in working with strategic allies on sharing best practices, detecting network vulnerabilities, and promoting cyber hygiene.

International cooperation to this degree is not an asset from which Russia benefits. With the support of research and development projects, expertise and training from NATO’s Cooperative Cyber ​​Defense Center of Excellence, US retaliation for a possible Russian cyberattack could be not only detrimental, but even deeper in as a multilateral response. Based on all of this, the fear of retaliation could indeed prevent Putin from engaging in offensive cyber operations against the United States.

Finally, Putin lost the upper hand by launching a surprise attack. For example, Russia invaded Georgia during the Beijing Olympics in 2008 and Ukraine during the Sochi Winter Olympics in 2014. When Putin went to war with Ukraine in 2022, by the way , immediately after the Beijing Winter Olympics, the West anticipated it. Putin still invaded Ukraine. He is unlikely to act recklessly in this way again, given the failures the Russian military has experienced since the invasion. Moreover, knowing that the United States and European allies have protected themselves, Putin has no reason to strike. Nevertheless, would Putin wait for a better moment? Or reduce a potential attack, for example, by interfering in the US midterm elections in November?

However, that would be misleading., underestimating Russian cyber capabilities or Putin’s mind games and losing vigilance. In 2020, despite denying involvement, Russia blatantly hacked US software company SolarWinds. By installing malware in the company’s updated Orion software program, the attack affected thousands of customers, around 100 companies such as Microsoft and Intel, and some federal agencies such as the Treasury Department, the Pentagon and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. Cyber ​​experts have called the code used phenomenal. Even more surprisingly, without a proper performance review and investigation, the attack could have easily gone unnoticed. For more than six months, Moscow tracked emails and other traffic of sensitive information. Could there already be similar malware in US networks?

Today, on the brink of a new Cold War, the United States must remain vigilant when it comes to cybersecurity. Although there are significant factors that cast doubt on the likelihood of an imminent Russian cyber-retaliation, the United States should not ignore the potential for malicious activity in the near future. He must keep a sober outlook and not act hastily. In setting long-term priorities, the United States must continue to advance cyber mechanisms that detect sensitive activity like the Solar Winds hack, and invest more in cyber hygiene training and education for government agencies, private companies and the public. He should not neglect to regularly test offline backups, run software updates, report incidents, use multi-factor authentication, block unusable domain IP addresses and assess third-party risks .

While Putin’s intentions are far from clear, his decision to pursue a cyberattack on critical US infrastructure that would instantly shut off electricity or disrupt clean water supplies, the breach could occur in any way unexpected, and soon. Conquered by sanctions and overwhelmed by the bitterness of defeat, Putin could act with fury. The United States and its Western allies must be vigilant and maintain strong lines of communication about any malicious activity. With a strong multilateral front in the West, Russia will have less incentive to engage in cyber warfare.

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War and other factors threaten maritime sector: report https://tcmechwars.com/war-and-other-factors-threaten-maritime-sector-report/ Fri, 27 May 2022 19:17:02 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/war-and-other-factors-threaten-maritime-sector-report/ While the decrease in total cargo losses worldwide is good news for marine insurers, the number of maritime accidents has increased in 2021, said the annual review of safety and navigation of Allianz Global Corporate & Specialties (AGCS). Globally, 54 total ship losses were reported in 2021, 11 less than in 2020. This is a […]]]>

While the decrease in total cargo losses worldwide is good news for marine insurers, the number of maritime accidents has increased in 2021, said the annual review of safety and navigation of Allianz Global Corporate & Specialties (AGCS).

Globally, 54 total ship losses were reported in 2021, 11 less than in 2020. This is a big improvement from the 1990s, when more than 200 ships per year were reported as total losses. (Impressive, since there are around 130,000 freighters operating in the world today, up from around 80,000 in the 1990s.)

The maritime region of southern China, Indochina, Indonesia and the Philippines recorded 12 losses in 2021. Loss factors were high levels of trade, congested ports, older fleets and poor conditions. extreme weather.

But, while overall losses have decreased, reports of maritime accidents or incidents have increased. The British Isles reported the most incidents (668 out of 3,000). Worldwide in 2021, 1,311 incidents were caused by damage to machinery, 222 by collisions and 178 by fires.

Over the past decade, 10 total ship losses have been reported in the Canadian Arctic and Alaska region, making it the 19e most frequent place of loss in the world, said the ACGS Canadian underwriter. The most common cause was sinking (sinking/submergence).

In addition, over the past 10 years, 508 maritime incidents have been reported in this region (most often machinery breakdowns), making it the 14e location of the most frequent incident.

The report also highlights impending factors that could quickly change what is now a generally positive story.

“The tragic situation in Ukraine has caused widespread disruptions in the Black Sea and elsewhere, exacerbating the ongoing supply chain, port congestion and crew crisis issues caused by the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Captain Rahul Khanna, who leads the Global Maritime Risk Advisory at AGCS. .

“[And] some of the industry’s responses to the shipping boom, such as changing usage or extending vessel life, also set off warning signals.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has affected the shipping industry in several ways, the report notes, including loss of life and ships in the Black Sea, disruption of trade and growing sanctions burden . Additionally, there are implications for day-to-day operations, crews, the cost and availability of marine fuel oil, and potentially more cyber risks.

A long war could potentially reshape global trade in energy and other commodities; and a stricter ban on Russian oil could push shipowners to use alternative fuels. “If these fuels are of substandard quality,” the report says, “this could lead to machine failure claims in the future.”

Onboard fires are also a growing concern. The report says there have been more than 70 reported fires on container ships over the past five years.

Fires can start due to misdeclaration (or lack of declaration) of dangerous goods, such as chemicals and batteries. And the increase in EV shipments creates challenges, as existing fire suppression measures might not respond properly to an EV fire.

Additionally, losses can be costly as the cargo is high value and it is costly to remove wrecks and mitigate pollution.

“Previously, a wreck could have been left in place if it posed no hazard to navigation,” Khanna said. “Now the authorities want the wrecks removed and the marine environment restored, whatever the cost.”

Photo courtesy of iStock.com/Federico Rostagno

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Roger Hagan: Technological innovation is essential to national security | Columnists https://tcmechwars.com/roger-hagan-technological-innovation-is-essential-to-national-security-columnists/ Wed, 25 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/roger-hagan-technological-innovation-is-essential-to-national-security-columnists/ ROGER HAGAN The war in Ukraine has shown how quickly peace can crumble. Europe has had seventy years without conflict between states, leading many to believe that permanent peace was the new norm. With these illusions shattered, we are now witnessing massive rearmament and investment in cybersecurity infrastructure by European countries to reduce their vulnerability […]]]>

ROGER HAGAN

The war in Ukraine has shown how quickly peace can crumble. Europe has had seventy years without conflict between states, leading many to believe that permanent peace was the new norm. With these illusions shattered, we are now witnessing massive rearmament and investment in cybersecurity infrastructure by European countries to reduce their vulnerability to Vladimir Putin’s predators.

The United States can learn many lessons from the Ukraine conflict. It seems that many Americans are eager to deny the threats posed to us by our foreign adversaries. It has been 20 years since we were attacked on our own soil. I fear we are now like the Europeans until just a few weeks ago – lulled into a false sense of security and in denial of those who wish to harm us.

Cyberwarfare threats are of growing concern. Do you remember last year’s attack on the Colonial Pipeline? This caused a fuel shortage on the East Coast and led President Biden to declare a state of emergency. Colonial Pipeline is just one of dozens of ransomware attacks on Americans in the past year – most of which failed to make national headlines.

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Given the pervasiveness of technology in our critical infrastructure, the targets for cyberattacks abound. The Federal Agency for Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security tracks sixteen critical infrastructure sectors that are vulnerable to attack – from our food supply to healthcare, communications and transportation.

As we saw with Colonial Pipeline, disrupting even a single cog in a complex system has far-reaching effects. In this example, the hackers saw an opportunity to get a ransom. But imagine the havoc we would see with a coordinated attack on multiple critical infrastructure sectors at the same time by a state-backed actor. Without launching a single ship or aircraft, a foreign adversary could cause serious damage.

We are already preparing to defend against these attacks in Montana. Our Montana National Guard Adjutant General has the authority to call in active duty guardsmen to defend against cyberattacks.

These threats are real and rapidly changing. Most alarmingly, we know that our worst enemies are investing heavily in the development of cyber capabilities. Hackers backed by Russia, China, Iran, North Korea and others are now capable of hitting US targets.

What can we do about it? On the one hand, our military and national security infrastructure is considered the most advanced in the world. It brings some comfort, but being the best doesn’t mean we’re invulnerable to attack.

This is why we must maintain our position as the world’s technological leader. We must increase investment in technology and continue to foster an environment of technological innovation.

China in particular is investing billions to beat the United States in technology and cybersecurity. In fact, becoming the world leader in technology is a stated goal of the Chinese Communist Party. It’s not just for economic reasons – Chinese leaders see technological innovation as a national security imperative.

For the United States to remain the leader in technological innovation, we must keep the government out. A responsible, pragmatic, and thoughtful approach to regulation has obviously served us well, but today we see growing calls for Washington to clamp down on our tech companies. It makes us more vulnerable.

It is heartening to see some leaders, like Senator Daines, acknowledging the threats posed by China. Senator Daines is leading the fight to strengthen our tech sector, for example by sponsoring the Endless Frontiers Act, which invests in innovation and holds China accountable for cyberattacks and intellectual property violations.

China sees us as its adversary. We must do the same and make the appropriate preparations to defend ourselves. As the Ukrainian experience has shown, we may be more vulnerable than we realize.

Roger Hagan is a former member of the Montana House of Representatives and a retired member of the United States Air Force and Air National Guard.

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Information wars and thick media overlays establish Russia’s propaganda strategy – The Organization for World Peace https://tcmechwars.com/information-wars-and-thick-media-overlays-establish-russias-propaganda-strategy-the-organization-for-world-peace/ Mon, 23 May 2022 21:34:23 +0000 https://tcmechwars.com/information-wars-and-thick-media-overlays-establish-russias-propaganda-strategy-the-organization-for-world-peace/ During the Russian-Ukrainian conflict, the emerging narrative gap between portrayals of the war in Western and Russian media outlets grew steadily wider. In a new analysis report from the New York Times, they explored Russian media images and noted massive inconsistencies in the portrayal and explanation of facts, images and events from the center of […]]]>

During the Russian-Ukrainian conflict, the emerging narrative gap between portrayals of the war in Western and Russian media outlets grew steadily wider. In a new analysis report from the New York Times, they explored Russian media images and noted massive inconsistencies in the portrayal and explanation of facts, images and events from the center of the conflict. Since “much of the Russian news media are tightly controlled by the Kremlin, with state television serving as the mouthpiece of the government”, recalls the Time, information is the main vehicle of Kremlin propaganda. “Russian television’s convoluted and sometimes contradictory accounts of the war are not only meant to convince viewers that their version of events is true,” the report states. what to believe. »

Instead of providing information and analysis to citizens, Russian media obscure the facts of their engagement with Ukraine. When a population is denied information, it lacks the power to make moral judgments or form opinions about domestic politics and its implications for foreign affairs. Russia’s regime of information authoritarianism mimics and contributes to the Kremlin’s tight control over its political culture, as well as the national culture of public opinion.

The Russian and Western insistence on adapting narratives in the interest of ensuring moral justification for acts of war is a step in creating the renewed mythos of national culture on which all countries rely. But “Russians who get their truth from state media live in an alternate reality,” CNN Business recounts, based on an interview with press analyst Madeline Roache. “Experts say Putin’s programming still has a very firm grip on Russian public opinion, despite a slew of real-life news reports from Ukraine that contradict it.”

Understanding oneself – or strategically situating oneself – in the context of a diverse and conflicted global community is an essential part of participating in it. CNN reports: “Jake Tapper said it well on Monday: Russia is engaging in a ‘fierce propaganda war to justify its brutal and unprovoked invasion and to try to cover up the growing number of atrocities and massacres committed against civilians Ukrainians”. seems hasty to assume the prerogative of placing deterministic narrative overlays on events at his whim. Russian propaganda might be enough to justify the war efforts in the country, but history, after all, is decided by the victors.

In the modern conflict climate, a large part of the country engagement strategy involves an information strategy. And the integral role played by intelligence in wartime decision-making has its public face in the national media. the New York Times news analysis project revealed that “on Russian television, the discovery [of brutalized civilian bodies] was instead presented as a hoax, with TV presenters analyzing images and videos for signs of counterfeiting. When the main media outlet is run by the state, the status of the media as propaganda outlets becomes immediately clear. the Jtime report notes that on several occasions “Russian television dissects[s] pictures [to raise] doubts about the Western narrative, often using the same images seen in the West to advance very different accounts of what happened. Propaganda is the name of a mode of interpretation applied to news, involving a distinct set of goals and a strategy for their execution.

Attacks targeting information systems and cyber infrastructures have become a major tool of modern conflicts. Reuters reports that Russia suffered a cyber breach this week, where the RuTube site was inaccessible during the country’s Victory Day celebrations. “Usually packed with video content, RuTube’s site is currently black,” Reuters reported. “Someone really wanted to stop RuTube from showing the Victory Day parade and celebratory fireworks,” RuTube said. “He described the cyberattack as the worst in the site’s history.” The information war continues and Russian national sites are hacked to display messages of condemnation, or “information that contradicts Moscow’s official line on what it calls a ‘special military operation'”. Reuters concludes.

Russia goes to great lengths to control the narrative internally, and breaches like these threaten that control. But as for Russian citizens, for CNN’s Nic Robertson, “It’s no surprise that so many people simply toe the Kremlin lines. It’s the easiest thing for them to do. They see no alternative. They feel helpless and this is information they were fed year after year by Putin and by the Soviet leadership at the time. Dissent, in an authoritarian culture, is heavily sanctioned and heavily punishable. Accepting the Kremlin’s reports might be the path of least resistance for a population accustomed to a national culture controlled, established and imposed by its self-narratives, but something has to change.

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